Meghan Markle & Prince Harry Criticized For Photoshopped Time Magazine Cover

Time magazine unveiled its annual list of the world's 100 most influential people this week.

Not surprisingly, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry made the cut, and the couple's massive fan base was ecstatic about the news.

Unfortunately, the rest of the internet had some snide remarks to make about Meghan and Harry's cover photo.

The Duke and Duchess are no strangers to social media mobs, of course -- but it's not often that their appearance is the focus of the criticism.

Harry and Meghan Time Cover

Yes, Meghan and Harry are being thoroughly roasted this week following what is likely one of the greatest honors of their respective careers.

But we guess they can take solace in the fact that they're not to blame for the backlash.

The photo used for the couple appears to be heavily airbrushed, which is a baffling editorial decision, as even the Sussexes' harshest critics admit that they're easy on the eyes.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry in 2018

Obviously, the hilariously gauzy photo didn't escape the internet's notice.

In fact, this might be the most Twitter vitriol directed at the Sussexes since they announced their decision to step down as senior members of the royal family.

And -- as is always the case on Twitter -- the critics did not hold back in their remarks.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Clap

“The airbrush is doing some heavy lifting there,” one person tweeted, according to Page Six.

“The cover looks so fake… oh wait it’s because they are,” another added.

“Is Harry wearing a rug? Or just overdone the air brushing?” a third chimed in.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry: A Photo

(The tweets about Harry's hairline alone were enough to fill a book.)

Others rightly pointed out that the blame here lies entirely with the Time magazine editorial team.

“Terrible retouching job. They look CGI," wrote one user.

Meghan Markle: A Photograph

“Jesus I thought this was a parody account with a clearly photoshopped creepy cover. Then I noticed the blue tick. Wow has @TIME fallen. Hard,” another observed.

Yet another person noticed that the pic was “so plastic” that they could not tell whether the image was “real or photoshopped.”

And then there were the people who focused on the strange way in which Harry and Meghan were posed.

Meghan Markle and Harry Interview

"Who approved this shot?! Is he standing? Is he sitting? Is he holding on to her shoulder so he doesn’t fall? Why would you make such lovely looking people look like this?” asked one inquisitive tweeter.

“Its like he’s cowering behind her,” another pointed out.

Thankfully, all of this trash-talk was counterbalanced by a good deal of praise for Harry and Meghan.

Prince Harry and Meghan Markle: All Smiles!

"Amazing cover! Love all the good work they are doing despite the vicious attacks coming at them by The Firm,” a fan tweeted. 

“Keep up the good work #HarryAndMeghan! Your humanitarian work speaks for itself," another added.

“It’s the glow for me … This is what peace and happiness does,” a third remarked.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry Under an Umbrella

The media has been bullying Harry and Meghan for years, so they're certainly no strangers to being hated on by strangers.

The only thing that might concern the couple is the possibility that this fixation on the cover photos will distract from the important message they're spreading through their work.

Those who actually bother to open the issue will find an interesting article about Harry and Meghan's charitable foundation, written by celebrity chef and humanitarian Jose Andres.

Meghan Markle and Prince Harry: A Portrait

“They turn compassion into boots on the ground through their Archewell Foundation. They give voice to the voiceless through media production,” Andres wrote.

“Hand in hand with nonprofit partners, they take risks to help communities in need — offering mental-health support to black women and girls in the US and feeding those affected by natural disasters in India and the Caribbean.”

Sounds like this work is a bit more important than an airbrushed pic -- but good look trying to convince Twitter of that.